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Resolved, that the legal voting age in all American elections be lowered to sixteen

Resolved, that the legal voting age in all American elections be lowered to sixteen

Link for reporting chapter debate results:HERE

November Debate of the Month: Resolved, that the legal voting age in all American elections be lowered to sixteen

Brief: The 26th amendment, ratified as part of the Constitution in 1971, lowered the legal voting age of all U.S. citizens to eighteen years of age. At the time, the public saw a grave injustice in the fact that many of the thousands of young men who were dying for America in Vietnam were not even legally old enough to vote in their county’s elections. In the present day, some have begun a new movement to once again lower America’s voting age, this time to sixteen. Some localities like Takoma Park, Maryland have already lowered the voting age to sixteen for all local elections, and many states allow for seventeen year olds to vote in state and presidential primaries. With recent elections highlighting dramatic political apathy among America’s youth, our nation must ask itself if lowering the voting age will generate fresh enthusiasm among young people towards civic engagement, or will it simply increase the size of America’s large number of young eligible voters who never make it to the polls?

Pro Arguments:

  • Preventing sixteen and seventeen year olds from expressing their views inside the ballot box ignores the reality that millions of teenagers are just as politically informed as the rest of the voting population.

  • There are a plethora of issues, from education to climate change to the national debt, that will especially affect America’s future generations but are currently being ignored by politicians who have no incentive to address the concerns of the youth.

  • Our government trust sixteen year olds enough to allow them to drive 2 ton vehicles at many miles per hour. If these citizens are capable of doing something so complicated and dangerous as driving, surely they’re capable enough to know which candidates reflect their political beliefs.

Con Arguments:

  • Although many teenagers may be informed about political issues, the vast majority of them aren’t and couldn’t care less about them. It would be irresponsible for America to hand the reigns of power to such a politically apathetic demographic.

  • Most sixteen and seventeen year olds have not even finished high school, let alone taken a class in civics or government. We need to ensure our country’s voters have at least progressed to adulthood before we can assume they are capable of making informed decisions of such importance.

  • The American young people who are currently eligible to vote have some of the lowest turnout rates of any group in our democracy. Lowering the voting age even further will not address the issues of young voter apathy, it will merely extend it to millions of more teenagers.

For more background on the ratification of the 26th Amendment click here. For more information on where the voting age has already been lowered in the U.S. click here. For more information about the youth vote in the United States click here. For more arguments in favor of this resolution click here. For more arguments against this resolution click here.

Posted in Featured, National Debate of the Month, Uncategorized0 Comments

Resolved, that all Presidential candidates on enough state ballots to win a majority vote in the Electoral College be included in the Presidential Debates

Resolved, that all Presidential candidates on enough state ballots to win a majority vote in the Electoral College be included in the Presidential Debates

Link for reporting chapter debate results:HERE

October Debate of the Month: Resolved, that all Presidential candidates on enough state ballots to win a majority vote in the Electoral College be included in the Presidential Debates.

Brief: During the current Presidential Election we have seen the American public’s opinion of the two major-party candidates reach historic lows, while the support for alternative choices has never been higher. This leads many to question why the nationally-televised debates hosted by the Commission on Presidential Debates do not include any of the presidential candidates besides Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. The Commission states that third-party candidates like Jill Stein and Gary Johnson, despite being on enough state ballots to be elected President, do not meet their minimum requirements for public support and therefore are not invited unless they reach 15 percent support among the voters in a series of respected Presidential preference polls. But considering most Americans would like to see third-party candidates included, is it time for the Commission to lax its rules and add the extra podiums, or do the current third-party candidates not receive enough support to justify their inclusion in these potentially election-deciding debates?

Pro Arguments:

  • It is extremely unlikely that any third-party candidate could reach the Commission’s current polling threshold, because in order to get that level of support candidates would need to get their message out during a major televised event like a Presidential Debate where they could speak to tens of millions of voters who may not know who they are otherwise.

  • Both Jill Stein and Gary Johnson are on enough state ballots to be elected President of the United States via the Electoral College, therefore the Commission should allow the American people to hear from all the possibilities and not set an arbitrary threshold based on polling, which can often misrepresent the will of the voters.

  • The two-party system does not represent the broad spectrum of Americans’ political views, and considering both the current major-party candidates’ unpopularity, adding more points of view to the debates would better reflect the true ideological diversity of our democracy.

Con Arguments:

  • The Commission’s requirement that candidates reach 15 percent in 5 well-respected presidential preference polls is a totally acceptable qualifier because there is no possibility a candidate with less support could win the election.

  • The two current third-party candidates that this resolution would include, Jill Stein and Gary Johnson, do not deserve to participate in the Presidential Debates because they are not remotely qualified candidates for the office, especially considering the former has a warrant out for her arrest and the later doesn’t even know what Aleppo is.

  • Two more candidates on the stage would be a distraction from the two candidates who could actually win the election, thus wasting the time of the American voters who want to hear from the person who will be their next President.

For information regarding the Commission on Presidential Debate’s requirements for candidates to be included click here. To see the two major candidates’ aggregated support in national polls since June click here. For an analysis of how significantly the Presidential Debates affect the election click here. For Governor Gary Johnson’s Presidential campaign website click here. For Dr. Jill Stein’s Presidential campaign website click here.

Posted in National Debate of the Month, Uncategorized0 Comments

Stand Up for JSA

Stand Up for JSA

jsa.10.11.15.050JSA builds tomorrow’s leaders – young people who are confident, articulate, thoughtful and respectful – just what our nation needs now more than ever!

Donate today and stand up for the power of youth voices.

Participating in JSA is truly a life-changing experience. Beyond the fun experienced at conventions and chapter activities, students gain skills that are necessary for success in higher education and the work place. Young people are also given a taste of university life, introducing them to the rigors of college-level classes, through JSA summer programs held at Georgetown, Princeton and Stanford.

 

Your Gift Will Be Doubled! Our volunteer Trustees believe passionately in JSA’s mission and have personally put up a $55,000 matching fund. It will double any amount you give by September 30th!

jsa.org/StandUp

We have something special here – please stand with us to keep it going.

Posted in Alumni & Friends, Be Inspired, Educators, Featured, JSA Today, MyJSA, News, Uncategorized0 Comments

JSA Alums publish book “When Millennials Rule: The Reshaping of America”

JSA Alums publish book “When Millennials Rule: The Reshaping of America”

The Junior State is excited to celebrate the release of When Millennials Rule: The Reshaping of America, an insightful new book about how young Americans are reimagining U.S. public policy. The book, written by JSA alumni David Cahn (NES ‘14) and Jack Cahn (NES ‘14), draws on the brothers’ experience crisscrossing the country – from Kentucky to Illinois to Minnesota – where the brothers talked with more than 10,000 millennials about important public policy issues like gun control and the economy.

“In high school, JSA gave us the opportunity to think critically about some of the most important issues facing this country, and a network of peers who constantly challenged us.” said Jack. “Whether is was through Georgetown Summer School, annual conventions, or local ‘mini-cons’ JSA made us better statesmen and more thoughtful leaders.”

Book CoverLast summer, the brothers flew out to the Montezuma Leadership Conference to conduct focus groups and learn from JSA’s current and future leaders.

“The JSA students we spoke to at Montezuma had such nuanced, thoughtful opinions about the issues they were talking about, it was really inspiring,” said David. “When we got back and incorporated these interviews into our manuscript, they really helped bring our book to life.”

On August 18th , the twins hosted a book launch event at the 92 nd St. Y in Manhattan. The topic of the talk was “What Will America Look Like When Millennials Rule.” The event began with a discussion of what makes millennials different from their parent’s generation. The speakers and audience members highlighted that their generation is the most tolerant of diversity and has access to more information than ever before. Featured guests included Nikhil Goyal, author of Schools on Trial, Kamran Parsa, JSA Northeast Governor, and Rohan Marwaha, JSA Mid-Atlantic Governor. “I think what really sets millennials apart is our access and reach. Every day millennials are exposed to as much information as someone in the 15th century was exposed to in their entire lifetime,” said Rohan Marwaha. “If you just take that into perspective, that’s a lot of information.”

“A lot of our JSA friends came out to support us. It was great to see so many old friends and to have a fun, rapid-fire conversation about the 2016 election and how our generation is going to influence the future,” David said.

When Millennials Rule is dedicated: “To America’s young leaders, the buck stops with you. To the Junior State of America, for investing in a civically engaged electorate.”

David Cahn is a former National Chief of Staff for JSA and Jack Cahn was National Director of Public Relations. Both were active JSA members for four-year as part of the Stuyvesant High School Chapter. The twins are now undergraduates at the University of Pennsylvania, where they both study Economics and Computer Science. They are frequent contributors to the Huffington Post.

David_CartWarburg_Book_Signing

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Resolved, all persons on Federal terror watch lists be prohibited from buying firearms and ammunition

Resolved, all persons on Federal terror watch lists be prohibited from buying firearms and ammunition

Report chapter results of the debate of the month HERE.

Resolved, all persons on Federal terror watch lists be prohibited from buying firearms and ammunition.

In the aftermath of multiple terrorist attacks on U.S. soil, such as those in San Bernardino and Orlando, many have called for a policy that would enable the U.S. Department of Justice to prohibit the sale of firearms to any person on federal terror watch lists such as the ‘no-fly list.’ On June 20th the Senate rejected four separate measures, two proposed by Republicans and two proposed by Democrats, that would make it possible to prohibit those on these watch lists from buying guns. Two days later, Democratic members of the House of Representatives staged a 26 hour sit-in demanding another vote be taken on these proposals. This debate has seen unusual pairs join forces with the liberal-leaning American Civil Liberties Union joining Conservative politicians like Ted Cruz to oppose the proposals, and with Republican nominee Donald Trump in large part agreeing with the Democratic President Barack Obama that these policies should be enacted.

Pro Arguments:

  • America has the most robust intelligence network in the world, if Federal agencies suspect someone of potential terrorist activities, they are too dangerous to own a gun.
  • The government has the authority to suspend someone’s constitutional rights when they pose an imminent risk to our national security.
  • Although likely rare, if someone is mistakenly put on a watch list they would be able to purchase firearms and ammunition after it is clear they are not a security risk.

Con Arguments:

  • This policy would violate Americans’ 5th and 14th Amendment entitlement to due process of law before having their right to bear arms subverted.
  • The American justice system was founded on the principle of “innocent until proven guilty,” but this policy would reverse that and require Americans to prove themselves innocent in courts where classified information would likely be used against them.
  • There is no evidence to suggest this policy would have prevented any of the recent terrorist attacks in the United States, such as those in Orlando and San Bernardino.

Additional Resources:

  • For general information about federal terror watch lists and how they currently affect the sale of firearms click here.
  • For a summary of who federal law currently prohibits from buying firearms and ammunition click here.
  • For a breakdown of the four terror-watch-list related gun-control proposals voted on by the Senate in June click here.
  • As this is certain to be discussed during the current election cycle, see below for the Republican and Democratic presidential nominees stances on guns.

Posted in Featured, National Debate of the Month, Uncategorized0 Comments

Fall State Pricing Guide

Pricing package details for all Fall State conventions are listed below.  Note that these prices apply only to chapters that register online using MyJSA. The paper registration fee is an additional $10 per student.  There is also a late fee of $15 per person for chapters that do not complete their registration by the registration deadline.

Fall State Pricing Package Details 2016

CONVENTIONEARLY REGISTRATION PRICESREGULAR REGISTRATION PRICES
Southern California
(Los Angeles)
Oct. 29 - 30, 2016
Early Bird Registration Period: Sept. 12 – Sept. 25

Student Package 1 - Registration Fee: $145

Teacher Package 1 - Shared Room: No Charge
Teacher Package 2 - Private Room: $120
Standard Registration Period: Sept. 26 – Oct. 13

Student Package 1 - Registration Fee: $185

Teacher Package 1 - Shared Room: No Charge
Teacher Package 2 - Private Room: $120
Northern California
Santa Clara Marriott
Nov. 12 - 13, 2016
Early Bird Registration Period: Sept. 26 – Oct. 9

Student Package 1 - Registration Fee: $145

Teacher Package 1 - Shared Room: No Charge
Teacher Package 2 - Private Room: $120
Standard Registration Period: Oct. 10 – Oct. 20

Student Package 1 - Registration Fee: $185

Teacher Package 1 - Shared Room: No Charge
Teacher Package 2 - Private Room: $120
Pacific Northwest
Doubletree Seattle Hotel Airport
Nov. 12 - 13, 2016
Early Bird Registration Period: Sept. 26 – Oct. 9

Student Package 1 - Registration Fee: $135
Student Package 2 - Registration Fee + Extra Night: $185

Teacher Package 1 - Shared Room: No Charge
Teacher Package 2 - Private Room: $100
Teacher Package 3 - Private Room 2 nights: $200
Standard Registration Period: Oct. 10 – Oct. 20

Student Package 1 - Registration Fee: $175
Student Package 2 - Registration Fee + Extra Night: $225

Teacher Package 1 - Shared Room: No Charge
Teacher Package 2 - Private Room: $100
Teacher Package 3 - Private Room 2 nights: $200
Southeast
DoubleTree Sawgrass Mills
Nov. 12 - 13, 2016
Early Bird Registration Period: Sept. 26 – Oct. 9

Student Package 1 - Registration Fee: $145
Student Package 2 - Registration Fee + Extra Night: $195

Teacher Package 1 - Shared Room: No Charge
Teacher Package 2 - Private Room: $115
Teacher Package 3 - Private Room 2 nights: $230
Standard Registration Period: Oct. 10 – Oct. 20

Student Package 1 - Registration Fee: $185
Student Package 2 - Registration Fee + Extra Night: $235

Teacher Package 1 - Shared Room: No Charge
Teacher Package 2 - Private Room: $115
Teacher Package 3 - Private Room 2 nights: $230
Arizona
Tucson Marriott University Park
Nov. 19 - 20, 2016
Early Bird Registration Period: Oct. 3 – Oct. 16

Student Package 1 - Registration Fee: $155
Student Package 2 - Registration Fee + Extra Night: $205

Teacher Package 1 - Shared Room: No Charge
Teacher Package 2 - Private Room: $110
Teacher Package 3 - Private Room 2 nights: $220
Standard Registration Period: Oct. 17 – Nov. 6

Student Package 1 - Registration Fee: $165
Student Package 2 - Registration Fee + Extra Night: $215

Teacher Package 1 - Shared Room: No Charge
Teacher Package 2 - Private Room: $110
Teacher Package 3 - Private Room 2 nights: $220
Mid-Atlantic
Renaissance Woodbridge Hotel
Nov. 19 - 20, 2016
Early Bird Registration Period: Oct. 3 – Oct. 16

Student Package 1 - Registration Fee: $135
Student Package 2 - Registration Fee + Extra Night: $185

Teacher Package 1 - Shared Room: No Charge
Teacher Package 2 - Private Room: $100
Teacher Package 3 - Private Room 2 nights: $200
Standard Registration Period: Oct. 17 – Nov. 6

Student Package 1 - Registration Fee: $175
Student Package 2 - Registration Fee + Extra Night: $225

Teacher Package 1 - Shared Room: No Charge
Teacher Package 2 - Private Room: $100
Teacher Package 3 - Private Room 2 nights: $200
Midwest
Madison Concourse Hotel
Nov. 19 - 20, 2016
Early Bird Registration Period: Oct. 3 – Oct. 16

Student Package 1 - Registration Fee: $135
Student Package 2 - Registration Fee + Extra Night: $185


Teacher Package 1 - Shared Room: No Charge
Teacher Package 2 - Private Room: $100
Teacher Package 3 - Private Room 2 nights: $200
Standard Registration Period: Oct. 17 – Nov. 6

Student Package 1 - Registration Fee: $175
Student Package 2 - Registration Fee + Extra Night: $225


Teacher Package 1 - Shared Room: No Charge
Teacher Package 2 - Private Room: $100
Teacher Package 3 - Private Room 2 nights: $200
Ohio River Valley
Cincinnati Marriott North
Nov. 19 - 20, 2016
Early Bird Registration Period: Oct. 3 – Oct. 16

Student Package 1 - Registration Fee: $135
Student Package 2 - Registration Fee + Extra Night: $185

Teacher Package 1 - Shared Room: No Charge
Teacher Package 2 - Private Room: $100
Teacher Package 3 - Private Room 2 nights: $200
Standard Registration Period: Oct. 17 – Nov. 6

Student Package 1 - Registration Fee: $175
Student Package 2 - Registration Fee + Extra Night: $225

Teacher Package 1 - Shared Room: No Charge
Teacher Package 2 - Private Room: $100
Teacher Package 3 - Private Room 2 nights: $200
Southern California
(Orange County)
Nov. 19 - 20, 2016
Early Bird Registration Period: Oct. 3 – Oct. 16

Student Package 1 - Registration Fee: $145

Teacher Package 1 - Shared Room: No Charge
Teacher Package 2 - Private Room: $120
Standard Registration Period: Oct. 17 – Oct. 26

Student Package 1 - Registration Fee: $185

Teacher Package 1 - Shared Room: No Charge
Teacher Package 2 - Private Room: $120
Texas
Sheraton Austin Hotel
Nov. 19 - 20, 2016
Early Bird Registration Period: Oct. 3 – Oct. 16

Student Package 1 - Registration Fee: $160
Student Package 2 - Registration Fee + Extra Night: $210

Teacher Package 1 - Shared Room: No Charge
Teacher Package 2 - Private Room: $160
Teacher Package 3 - Private Room 2 nights: $320
Standard Registration Period: Oct. 17 – Nov. 3

Student Package 1 - Registration Fee: $200
Student Package 2 - Registration Fee + Extra Night: $250

Teacher Package 1 - Shared Room: No Charge
Teacher Package 2 - Private Room: $160
Teacher Package 3 - Private Room 2 nights: $320
Northeast
Boston Park Plaza Hotel
Dec. 10 - 11, 2016
Early Bird Registration Period: Oct. 24 – Nov. 6

Student Package 1 - Registration Fee: $165
Student Package 2 - Registration Fee + Extra Night: $215

Teacher Package 1 - Shared Room: No Charge
Teacher Package 2 - Private Room: $160
Teacher Package 3 - Private Room 2 nights: $320
Standard Registration Period: Nov. 7 – Nov. 23

Student Package 1 - Registration Fee: $200
Student Package 2 - Registration Fee + Extra Night: $250

Teacher Package 1 - Shared Room: No Charge
Teacher Package 2 - Private Room: $160
Teacher Package 3 - Private Room 2 nights: $320


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